Monday, July 8, 2013

Library Journal's Verdict: Recommended

"Cohen (Missing a Beat: The Rants and Regrets of Seymour Krim) presents a well-researched, interesting study of song parodist Allan Sherman. . . . The book also functions as a well thought out cultural history of Jewish Americans in the mid- to late 20th century." 




If you subscribe to Library Journal you can read the whole review here.


If not, I've posted it below.  (From Overweight Sensation's Barnes & Noble page.)


Library Journal
Cohen (Missing a Beat: The Rants and Regrets of Seymour Krim) presents a well-researched, interesting study of song parodist Allan Sherman. Sherman was one of the first Jewish comedians to become internationally famous with Borscht Belt-style, Jewish-specific material, such as his biggest hit, "Hello Muddah, Hello Fadduh." (President Kennedy was one notable fan.) The book describes Sherman's early years, when he moved all over the country after his parents split up; his college years at the University of Illinois, where he first became known for his novelty songs and where his goofball antics later got him expelled; and his rapid fame and decline into obscurity. Sherman struggled with lung disease and diabetes later in life and died in 1973, two years shy of his 50th birthday. Cohen's goal is to ensure that Sherman gets the credit he deserves for his groundbreaking comedy. The book also functions as a well thought out cultural history of Jewish Americans in the mid- to late 20th century. VERDICT Recommended for readers interested in Jewish comedy, Allan Sherman, song parodies, and comedian biographies.—Sally Bryant, Pepperdine Univ. Lib., Malibu, CA

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